3-Color Simple Habit Tracker: Showcase and Insights

bujo habit tracker

Bullet journal habit tracker is one of the prettiest thing I’ve ever seen. Really; I mean it. It’s actually one of the many reasons I decided to toss my existing planning system (even though I liked it a bunch!) and embrace the prettiness and flexibility of bullet journaling.

That being said, setting up a habit tracker page has been a lot of fun. The first time I did it was the first month I started bullet journaling (yes, right away), August 2016. It was kind of a mess and I skipped most of the days out of laziness. So, here’s my November habit tracker instead.

bujo habit tracker

I use coloring pencils to mark the activities I managed to do each day. By choosing only 3 colors: red, orange, and yellow, I was able to keep it pretty but simple.

bujo habit tracker

On some days, I excuse myself from some desired-habits because I was engaged in another all-day activity. I think this is important because that way I don’t feel bad about myself and retain my confidence in making the habit stick, so I’m going to keep on doing that.

I’m still struggling on some desired-habits, but I’m getting better on my morning ones. The rest is a lot harder because I rarely set a specific time apart to actually do them, so every time I get a little busy, the habit got forgotten.

Monthly habit tracker is a very simple yet useful way to help form new habits. For me, it’s not just a tracker. It’s a motivation to actually stick to my habits, so I can shade those boxes and they can look pretty. Yes, really. It’s a satisfaction of its own.

How’s your habit-keeping going?

Supplies:

 

Year at a Glance: My (First) Take on a Very Simple Future Log

bullet journal future log simple

I’ve been bullet journaling ever-so-loosely for the last few months. While I’m mostly using the daily spread and goal tracking, I finally decided to give Future Log a try.
Basically, it’s a year-at-a-glance system that allows you to easily spot important dates and the corresponding information. I was mainly interested because how pretty it looks (I know, right?), but a future log can also serve as a calendar; a convenient way to refer back and see any date in the year in your journal.

bullet journal future log
So, it wasn’t until I’m writing this post that I found out that the kind of month-to-month log I’m using is often called Ryder Carroll’s future log as he’s the one who first introduced the system.
This is how my future log looks like:

bullet journal future log ryder
bullet journal future log

As you can see, I started in December. Yes, I refuse to wait one whole month to start something and so should you. Start right now.
I used watercolor to write the months and clearly I have no idea what I’m doing (look at my “december”!) but what the heck; it was fun!

A closer look:

bujo future log watercolor monthly

 

The year is long ahead so I haven’t fill in much detail. I realized that if I mark every plan, events or appointments, it will get uncomfortably crowded. So in the middle of marking dates (I know, for a planner I don’t plan ahead much) I decided that this future log is only for blog-related goals or appointments or milestones. That way, I can avoid it getting too stuffed.

As for other aspects of my life, who knows? Maybe I’ll make another future log or try other log methods. What would you guys recommend?

Ryder Carroll’s Future Log
Pros:
Easy to make
Easy to look/understand
Doesn’t take a lot of space (6+ whole months in two pages!)
Minimalist-looking

Cons:
May get crowded quickly and easily